The start of our project

Why did we start this project?

In the spring of 2018 we went to Ghana. Besides the amazing experience we had there, we also saw a lot of difficulties. One of them being the lack of menstrual hygiene. We very shocked to see how the girls were limited by this issue. For example they were not comfortable with the fact that did not have any products or were not even allowed to enter the school because everyone was disgusted by them. The fact that they are treated this way during their menstruation is not okay and we want to do something to help them.

 

The women’s experiences

In April, we sent the menstrual cups to Ghana, in order to receive feedback from the girls who live there. These are their responses:

 

‘’My name is Rita Aboagyewaa. I’m a member of Royal Ladies. I think the washable pads are very good. When you use it, you can sit comfortably and do whatever you want to do. I advise you to do it in sizes, that those who have heavy flow have access, too.’’

 

‘’My name is Diana Ayensu. I’m a member of the Royal Ladies. The washable pad is good and can sustain me and the girls. Because of the pads we buy every month, some have to look for boys to give them money before they buy it. Now, we don’t have to rely on anybody for pads. Thank you.’’

 

In September 2019 a 14-year-old Kenyan girl took her own life after being humiliated by a teacher for having her period and staining her uniform. The teacher called her dirty and ordered her to leave the class. The girl went home andhanged herself while her mother was getting water. Her mother staged a protest with approximately 200 other parents outside the school. The police made five arrests when they blocked a road and pulled down the school gate. Since then, the school has been closed.

A report by the United Nations in 2014 said that in sub-Saharan Africa one in 10 girls missed school during their period. Some girls lose 20% of their education for this reason and this makes it more likely to drop out of school altogether.

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-49661658


«   »

Add comment

Comments

There are no comments yet.